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What are your overall thoughts (SPOILERS)?  

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(@dan-santoli)
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November 1, 2019 12:28 pm  

What are your overall thoughts (SPOILERS) ?

This topic was modified 4 months ago 6 times by Dan Santoli

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 Noel Zickefoose
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November 4, 2019 10:56 am  

I listened to the audiobook for this title and really enjoyed it; it was still Part 1 when I found myself becoming more involved with the characters and wanting to know what was going to happen. I had several people tell me that the reviews weren't strong for this book, so maybe I went in with lower expectations, but after finishing the audiobook, I'm struggling to understand why people would be critical of the book. I enjoyed hearing how the two girls from two different worlds came together and supported each other through a difficult experience, I appreciated being able to "experience" the events of that night from an insider perspective, and felt that the struggles both girls felt and the way they had to overcome their biases was well done and inspiring. There were times when the portrayal of the character "Lena" felt perhaps a bit overly stereotypical, but I honestly don't feel like I should even be saying that as a white person...what do I know? I didn't feel that the white character portrayal was stereotypical, and I will have to leave it up to the African American readers to say if Lena came across as stereotypical to them or not. I enjoyed this book quite a bit and would recommend it to high school students (not younger), mainly because of some language and the way that Lena's relationship with her boyfriend is portrayed. Nothing overly risque but just didn't seem middle school appropriate to me.


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 Mikayla
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November 4, 2019 1:40 pm  

I loved this one! Read it in one sitting. The back and forth and the ultra fast pace made for a great read, especially when you consider the tough themes that were tackled in this one. Having two different authors writing the two girls made their differences even clearer, and I can't wait to start recommending this to others. 


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 Ameer
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November 4, 2019 3:03 pm  

I like that!


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 Daisy
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November 5, 2019 10:32 am  

The book was entertaining but I was disappointed that Lena, Black, and his crew were portrayed in such a stereotypical manner, from the dialect to the lack of moral character of Black's crew at times.  I've never been a part of a Library big read and was excited about the opportunity to share a read globally. Now, I am disheartened that this polarized view of our cultures is what we've chosen to share. As with life sometimes, there was no good feeling at the end but I hope we can see the commonalities that bring us together as humans. 

It was a good read that I'm sure will spark good discussion. 

 


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 Heather
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November 5, 2019 12:50 pm  

I read this in one sitting. It was a very fast read. I liked the alternating pov's. It helped move the story along and allowed for insight to both characters. I would like a sequel so we can follow up with them and see how their relationship progresses now that they have endured so much together. 


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 Leslie
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November 5, 2019 12:51 pm  

I thought the book was excellent. However, much was very similar to The Hate U Give.

These are both important messages that are helpful to understand various points of view.


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 Olivia Guo
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November 5, 2019 11:24 pm  

       Forgive my poor grammar.

       This book made me rethink about the whole situation of the riots, especially when Nana said to Campbell that she's sorry about what happened to store, but the protest didn't start with looting or violation, it started peaceful. And then, Nana said something that I want to directly quote it from the book, "When you push people to their breaking point, and they ain't got no power, they'll find a way to take it. What's so wrong with that?" 

       Now,

       Do you remember when you were at school, people teasing you by something that you cannot control? like your big horse-teeth, like your below-average height, like the way you talk, like your family ---- for me, it's my over-sized body and my short-almost-doesn't-existed neck . 

      And imagining that kind of feeling happened since you were still a kid, it just happened with strangers, randomly, or sometimes you even feel the whole society is after you just based on your conditions that it's out-of-your-control. At first, you try to talk sense but it still coming back---- You can't really change anything about it. What would you become?

     I remember Stanisław Jerzy Lec (was a Polish aphorist and poet) ever said "Żaden płatek śniegu nie czuje się odpowiedzialny za lawinę." you probably more familiar with it in English, "No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible.".

     Maybe, a lot of extreme things happened are because of us, although we thought we never did anything to it. Or maybe, it just because we NEVER trying to do anything about it. 

 

    

   

 

             


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 Lisa
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November 6, 2019 12:24 pm  

@Mikayla

I didn't realize there were two authors. I'm not quite done with it, so I'll be more attuned as I finish up.

 


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 Jenayra Rodriguez
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November 6, 2019 1:16 pm  

I absolutely loved it!!! The concept of having 2 different authors from different ethnicity portray each one of the characters brings a high level of authenticity that you would not have encountered otherwise. This was a quick read as the story was very captivating describing the surrounding events. It basically shows you how 2 individuals can experience the same situation but through different POV. However one thing remain constant the sisterhood they both developed dealing with the situation. They did not  have to understand each other or even be friends but the way they looked out for one another shows women empowerment. I also did not think it was stereotypical the way the black girl was portray. I was raised in Miami and I’m very familiar with the slangs. 


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 Lila
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November 6, 2019 2:41 pm  

I thought that the way that this book addressed commonplace racism in the midst of disaster was an interesting way of discussing large, and often uncomfortable, issues while still keeping the reader engaged. My only issue with the book was with Lena and her friends. I did not like how they seemed portrayed in an overly stereotypical way. 


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 Rae
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November 6, 2019 4:52 pm  

I enjoyed the book, I especially liked watching Campbell really question her inherent biases over the book. How she had sort of subconsciously made all these assumptions about her classmates and the people around her without realizing it.  I liked that Lena grew to respect Campbell more and more over the night as the two stuck together. 

I would be interested to see a sequel with the two characters going over the aftermath of the riots and how things changed for them at school with all their other friends. 


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 Julie
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November 6, 2019 9:17 pm  

I read it in almost one sitting. Kept me up till 12:30 last night. It starts with a premise similar to All American Boys in which we get dual POVs of a racial situation from two teens voiced by two authors. But as soon as the football field incident blows up, it becomes its own book and really takes off.

I liked the relationship that developed between the two girls. I did think that Lena's friends were a little stereotypical, but then Campbell didn't have any friends at all, so there isn't much of a way to compare them to anyone. Campbell does run into a guy who was supposed to be watching her father's store, and he's a jerk. Some of the minor characters were realistic and interesting, like the weed-dealing kid in the concession stand and Happy the street dude.

There are a lot of books right now that deal with themes of racial violence, but this one is a good quick read. No reason everyone shouldn't like it.

 


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 Melissa D
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November 7, 2019 12:02 am  

Wow. This book was excellent. The girls were a *little* stereotypical, but that just goes to show, particularly in Lena's case, how much the entertainment industry influences our country's youth. I was like Campbell in high school; lived in an area that was much wealthier than my family, but it was where my dad worked. He made the bills, but there wasn't room for anything else in the budget. My divorced parents couldn't pay child support to each other, so I didn't even get to participate in team sports like she did in her life before the move. 

I think the line in the book that Olivia referenced is insightful, but I find one thing wedding with the question.

Posted by: @Olivia Guo

"When you push people to their breaking point, and they ain't got no power, they'll find a way to take it. What's so wrong with that?" 

Maybe it comes with age and experience, but I would answer that question like this, and it really specifically answers it as it pertains to this situation: 

Taking things that don't belong to you doesn't give you power. Selling them for money? Money doesn't give you power. Money gives you influence. Violence doesn't give you power. Violence gets people hurt. Hurting people doesn't give you power. The only thing that gives you power in this world is knowledge.

Last thought: When you have two people who don't share the same view of the world, get together, there's a possibility that they can open each other's eyes to a different perspective, such as what Lena and Campbell did, even in that small degree. When you have whole groups of people trying to convince other groups of people to see from their perspective, gunfights, riots, and wars break out. 

 


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 Rhonda
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November 7, 2019 10:13 am  

At times, I felt the characters overlapped and had difficulty separating them. Overall, the book aptly captured the emotional surges that led to mutual respect. Fear and survival motivated an allegiance necessary to trust through their differences.  


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